Posts Tagged ‘independant’

Over the past three years we have come across many videos guiding new film makers with step-by-step
lessons that allow them to create functional products on a tight budget. We’ve also noticed that
because of these tutorials, every filmmaker that follows them may look like a crazed plumber. 

The following is a list of video links and descriptions that we have found helpful. Hopefully you
can step up your productions to the next level using these products and techniques.

A $20 camera slider from Indy Mogul: HERE

A $42 Steadicam from Rgsauve: HERE *This is how you hold the Steadicam by Rgsauve.

A $9 Steadicam for Iphones from Cgrusden: HERE

This is just the beginning. We will seek out other great tutorials that have footage to show that the
products are worth your time. Currently there are thousands of videos out there. Sadly, it’s hard to
find easy products that have great video footage to back them up. 

Simply making a product like these will not allow you to make better movies. You must train with them.
Use them often and for different tasks. Learn what each product can benefit. Just because you have a
Steadicam doesn’t mean your whole project should be shot using it. Each product has it’s own strength,
find out what that is and add it to your movie. 

If you decide to make these products on your own, please BE CAREFUL.

-Happy filmmaking!
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Time to sink our teeth into our first assigned project.

This one comes from a school called Sheridan College. It’s based in Oakville, Ontario, Canada.
This project was taken from the “Media Arts” program. http://www.sheridancollege.ca/

Take a series of photographs (all landscape, not portrait) to create a storyboard. You must set-up
your story using a total of eight or less photos.
Each photo must use different composition (framing and type of shot). The camera must follow the 180°
axis rule. Your goal is to establish a location and set up your story.
*If you do not have access to a camera, you may draw each frame.

Storyboarding is the best way to find out if you are correctly representing your script visually.
You may have heard the expression “Shoot it on paper first.” It is a cheap way to produce a first
draft of your film. After your script is written (or you have received one from your writer) you must
put thought into how you will show the images in your head to your audience. What do you want the
audience to see? How will you make your audience feel emotion by stimulating them visually? What
shots will fit into what you are trying to achieve? Take your time and write down what you see in
your head. Do it two or three times. Make sure you don’t miss anything.

Creating a storyboard will allow you to tweak shots and cut out others that are not needed. A
storyboard will also help you plan out what you need to shoot. Try not to waste your time and all
of your actors/crew’s time on set by walking around trying to figure out how to shoot the project.
Shoot it on paper first!
Grab a camera, get out there and try this out. Follow the rules and see what you can learn from making
your own version of this project. When you are all done, post it online so others can help you figure
out where you succeeded and where you need to work out some ideas. Also, post it HERE! We have an
audience that will watch your work and give you feedback.

-Have fun and good luck! 

*This is an example of a storyboard - for our newcomers.